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School and Church Constructed1

Education and Worship a Priority
 
After the erection of modest frame houses, shanties and dugouts, the first aim of the pioneers was to provide schools for the children and places of worship for congregations to be organized.
 
Elections were held to choose school board officers; congregations were organized and services were conducted in various school houses, which became centers for civic, social and religious gatherings.
 
First Church Constructed
 
In 1906 a church building was erected in Manfred serving the Lutheran congregations and others. It is still serving as a place of worship for the American Lutheran Church organized seventy years ago.
 
First School House
 
The first school house in Manfred Township in 1893 was a little building located on the south side of the tracks in Manfred.
 
Sadie Hutchinson of New York state was the first teacher and Marshall Brinton was the first County Superintendent of Schools.  A former pupil of this little school, now 73 years of age is living and active in Scobey, Montana.  She is Emma Nordtorp and she has sent the following song which seemed to be popular at that time.

 

Forty little urchins coming thru the door

Pushing, crowding, making a tremendous roar.

“You must keep more quiet, Can’t you mind the rule?”

Bless me, this is pleasant, teaching public school.

 

Forty little urchins on the road to fame,

If they fail to reach it, who will be to blame?

High and lowly station, brought together here.

On a common level, meet from year to year.

 

Dirty little faces, loving little hearts

Eyes so full of mischief, skilled in all its arts.

“That’s a precious darling, what are you about?”

Half a dozen asking, “Please may I go out?”

 

Anxious parents drop in, merely to inquire

Why their olive branches do not shoot up higher.

Spelling, reading, thumping those who break the rule

Bless me this is pleasant, teaching public school.

Source:  Sennev Nertrost Whipple
Date March 1966